778 216 0250 / 403 450 7714

Your Domain Name and You

Your Domain Name and You

Ok, so your domain name is important; it’s quite important actually.  A domain name can tell a potential client a lot about your business, and that’s before they even head to your website.  A domain name will be where someone finds your website, where all of your emails come from, and will appear on every piece of marketing you do from when you get a domain up until… well… ever.

It looks like an easy enough process: go to a registrar, enter the domain name, and click the “purchase” button.  But you need to put a lot more thought into the process which they don’t explain on those websites.

Dot-what?

.com is still king.  It will be king for a long time until we are forced not to buy .com addresses any more

 

The first decision has to do with what extension you are using.  The extension is the part that occurs after the dot and is important because when choosing a domain name, the each extension has its own allowance for domain names separate from each other… for example company.com and company.ca can be owned by two different people and go to two different websites.  Extensions have also had an increase in options appear over the last few years.  But what one should you choose, and should you choose more than one?

The answer is that unless you have a specific reason not to, .com is still king.  It will be king for a long time until we are forced not to buy .com addresses any more, or it becomes too difficult to get a name that.  It doesn’t mean that any other extension cannot be used or you should feel worse about using them, but where you can, get .com secured.  .net is another extension which is accepted as common place and can be used if needed.

The reason .com is king is simply because people will default to that when remembering your address… tell a person that your site is company.co may turn into company.com in their memory over the course of the day.  This is why the new addresses such as .co will also not take over for .com for quite some time.

When to use another extension

Sometimes you just have to decide to use another domain name though.  Say your company is named something common like “A1” or “Triple A”, it’s going to be hard to get a domain name close to what you want based on the naming rules below, and it is at that point that using a1financial.co is better than using a1financialserviceslimited.com.  Just know that your potential client may accidentally look at whatever is at .com, so make sure it isn’t a direct competitor.

I want my domain to be short, easy to remember, and witty

Different people want different things from their domains.  Some people are positive that their city should be in a domain name.  Others stand by the idea that the sector of business they are in should be found somewhere in it.

The short answer is that you should pick something that can be remembered at the end of a work day.  It doesn’t matter what else you choose, and you’ve already chosen a company name so hopefully you like it, but as long as it can be remembered then you have chosen a good domain name.  With that one rule aside, here are some helpful guidelines.

  1. The shorter the better:  the shorter the domain name, the easier it is to remember.  If your name is direct international productions ltd, perhaps think about directint.com or directproductions.com
  2. You don’t need to include extras: what you do, where you are, and how you do it doesn’t need to be in your domain name.  Google will find it in your website, so telling people where you are located in your domain name is unnecessary.
  3. Make the domain something that you can verbally communicate to someone; they won’t always have your business card or an email in front of them, so you should be able to tell them your address over the phone or in person.
  4. Write it down and then look at it.  Have someone else look at it too.  I am reminded of the famous (or infamous) website for a pen company called “Pen Island” that has the domain name www.penisland.net.  5 minutes with that domain name could have saved them this misfortune.
  5. Make sure it cannot be spelled too many other ways.  I know that our name can go by chewymedia.com or chewiemedia.com, so we aren’t following all of the rules perfectly, but if you can make sure that you aren’t spelling out the name 5 times over the phone.
What’s wrong with my email?

Additionally, it also sends a subconscious message that you are serious about what you do

Alright, the domain name is purchased and you love it.  It’s short, easy to remember, doesn’t spell into anything unfortunate, and you aren’t repeating the spelling 5 times.  So why are you not using it every day?

Most people still use their old email addresses for business these days.  Hotmail, Gmail, Yahoo, internet service provider emails… you are advertising their businesses for free every time you send an email.  In business, perception is important, so why not leverage something like a professional company email address using your own domain name.  You don’t even need to get rid of your old AOL email either; just forward the email domain to your old email if you like; but please start giving out your new domain name based email address.  Using an email address with your domain name also helps drive a small amount of web traffic to your website in the form of curious email recipients.  Additionally, it also sends a subconscious message that you are serious about what you do; and it’s one of the easier things you will do with your domain name.

1 fish 2 fish, red… yeah ok

So do you have to choose just one?  The answer is no… please choose as many as you think you need.  There is no need to go over-board (no need to grab 100 domain names here), but by all means grab the .ca and .co of your domain at the same time; ensuring no one else can get accidental clicks is a good way to be and can prevent a competitor from snatching up a domain name.  Slogans, alternate spellings, and common errors if there are spelling errors are also a good idea; as is your trade name if you can get that too.  All of these domain names can be pointed to the same website, so there is no worry in how many you do get.

Take it seriously; but not too seriously.

A domain name can be serious business, but it should also be fun.  Getting a domain name is an exciting time; it’s like staking out your own plot of land in the frontier known as the internet.  It’s up to you to decide how you want to be viewed; and definitely should be taken into account when deciding branding strategies.

Related Post
iStock_000017242880Medium_3
Expectations VS Reality – The “Client’s Dog” rule and giving your website a chance

We develop and design websites every day that we are excited about.  This isn’t fan-service or corporate speak for “we take your project seriously, so hire us.”  This is the truth.  Sure, we work on projects that have parts of the project that we aren’t crazy about.  I’ll admit that too.  Sometimes a design or development requirement occurs that makes our concern level rise about the project.  The joke in the website design industry and around the office which I will now refer to as the “Client’s Dog” rule is that every client wants something on their design that can be seen as inappropriate or out of place for the design.  Sometimes this is a mascot.  Sometimes it is the owner.  Sometimes this is a picture of the owner’s boat, favorite sport’s team, or other interest.

Usually it is a pet.

 

We realized as we reflected on our role in facilitating that rule, that we have also embraced this rule for a couple of other clients with strong success

 

We realized a while into referring to this rule that this is in fact a rule that we have broken to the nth degree with our business.  Chewie is a pet, and the business does not only have her on the site, but is also actually named after her.  In this case, she is my pet. We realized as we reflected on our role in facilitating that rule, that we have also embraced this rule for a couple of other clients with strong success.

And we also realized something important that day.

Despite the state of any project we are involved in at any given time, and despite the level of “Client’s Dog” that is taking place within a project – we are universally excited about the project that goes out into the world.  Every. Single. Time.  We get attached, we work programming magic to make things better or more robust than the project calls for.  We make lists capable of handling hundreds of items, when there will only ever be 4 items.

 

We build websites that we want to see on the internet.  And because of this, our excitement usually mirrors that of our clients’ excitement.

 

We make images that expand and contract automatically when these images will hardly ever change.  We build websites that we want to see on the internet.  And because of this, our excitement usually mirrors that of our clients’ excitement.
And this is where the thrust of this entry is found.

Websites need to be given a chance.  We’ve been conditioned that since everything is so quick with technology, that our amazing website that has everything and the kitchen sink will also be able to climb the ranks of google in one day and sit atop that lofty throne like the champion that it is.  Unfortunately, this is not always the case.  The case is that the brand new site that just got created is now competing with all of the other existing websites out there of its kind.  And those have been around for a lot longer and have a lot more content and a lot more money spent into crafting how content has been created to show up when someone looks up anything to do with their site.

 

This helps organic listings.  We make sure meta-tags, descriptions, relevant content, location tags, and structure all fall in line with what google likes.

 

Google is not instant.  It will crawl a site, but it will take time to decide on how your site should be ranked.  Age has something to do with it, frequent, relevant content has something to do with it.  And sometimes it just takes a while to see how the site will be situated in the rankings.  Having a properly built website is the first step; we make sure that is taken care of.  This helps organic listings.  We make sure meta-tags, descriptions, relevant content, location tags, and structure all fall in line with what google likes.  The second step is of course your content: updates are important.  The third step is SEO and advertising.  This can be done with google adwords and campaigns.  This also can be done with advertising – the more people that hear about your site, the more visitors you get, and the more Google ranks your site.

 

Rome wasn’t built in a day and unfortunately, Google rankings can’t be as well.

 

But this all comes back to expectations.  We expect this to be instant.  The doors open and suddenly the internet basks in the glory of that new website.  New website smell bursts through the google ranks and into the homes of the entire population of planet earth.  This doesn’t happen though, Rome wasn’t built in a day and unfortunately, Google rankings can’t be as well.

However, this isn’t a bad thing – this is a great thing.  This means that you can appear at the top as well.  Just continue doing the right things: building a quality website, doing quality work as a business, and being good to your clients.  And much like your company, your website status will grow.  Spend some money on SEO, but get the word out there too.  You will see monthly visitors grow.  And this is the important metric – not total visitors, but comparison from previous months.

Because even if 200 people see your site in a month sometimes, that is 200 more people who know about your business than a month before.  And the next month those are 200 or more people again.  Your website is an amazingly powerful marketing tool that can be used to get your message out to everybody that can possibly get to your site.  But it’s still a tool.

So give it a chance. 

Read more
iStock_000017681681Large_3
Back in the saddle again (or “What happens when your host is no longer fulfilling your needs”)

Okay, here we go.  I know, we broke our rule on blog writing… again.  We but we adhered to another cardinal rule in business: keep your clients happy.  And we did this over the last 2 months as we positioned all of our offerings to reinforce this core value at Chewie Media.  A pillar in our services ecosystem that this became most obvious was our hosting offering.

Chewie Media offers a completely managed hosting service for a nominal fee, or completely included in our monthly website plans.  This is part of our desire to take the headaches out of website building and design.  Being a completely managed hosting service, this can sometimes incur significant time investment from us during times of site migration, unexpected content loss by our clients (hey, mistakes happen!  That’s what we’re here for), or the occasional security breach (I’m looking at you, SSL).  We also have to make sure we are up on some of the latest requirements by governing bodies such as the new Canadian anti-spam laws which put some of the onus on the website hosts running email services, such as us.

 

Drupal has been a cornerstone of our development platform for years, and some of our developers, primarily myself, have been working with Drupal for almost a decade.

 

I mention all of this because we ran into an issue with our service provider – we lease out servers as a way to provide more value for what is paid, and to ensure that one singular point of failure would be unable to bring down any website.  This issue had been cropping up now for the previous few months – websites were responding slower than expected and large-scale websites were noticeably sluggish.  We were unhappy with this situation and had worked previously with techs at this service provider to remedy the situation.  All attempts to fix this sluggish response was met with responses such as “Drupal is known to be slow, this is a software issue.”

We knew this wasn’t the case; Drupal has been a cornerstone of our development platform for years, and some of our developers, primarily myself, have been working with Drupal for almost a decade.  Drupal can be slow if configured incorrectly, but in the right hands it can be snappy and powerful.

Eventually we had to look elsewhere.

 

if we are available to our clients at 3:00 am in the morning during an emergency, then our service provider should be right there as well if things get hairy (and not the good, four-legged kind).

 

We went with a company which has been known to work with Drupal and other CMS frameworks, and has had significantly good reviews.  Scratch that, we actually ran tests on multiple providers before settling on this one.  We decided to test out a different offering from MediaTemple, Bluehost Virtual Servers, and StormOnDemand Virtual Servers.  We decided number one had to be speed, but a close second had to be service; if we are available to our clients at 3:00 am in the morning during an emergency, then our service provider should be right there as well if things get hairy (and not the good, four-legged kind).  Our third option was customizability; how well would we be able to customize things to get precisely what we wanted out of the service provider.

Sparing the details, we were amazed with what we got out of the service and technologies provided by StormOnDemand.  They completely overshot what we had experienced from our other two test cases, and confirmed our suspicions that all of the websites we were hosting should be able to respond quicker.  For most of the websites we host, we encountered a 200% increase in speed.  This increased to 800% for large-scale websites, and over 1000% for e-commerce websites – the results were simply staggering.  As we began focusing on e-commerce websites and other large-scale sites with over 10,000 pages per site, this was an amazing development!

 

We believe in the long run, the payoff in performance and added client satisfaction should more than make up for the amount of time invested by us up-front.

 

Why this was exciting to us was that we were then able to provide this increase in service back to all of our clients without charging a dime.  However, the man-hours to make this change were significant, but this is one of the differences between self-serve hosting for your website and fully managed hosting by us.  We believe in the long run, the payoff in performance and added client satisfaction should more than make up for the amount of time invested by us up-front.

Making a change like this, while also providing our usual website development and design services to our clients has kept us busy, but we hope to not use this as an excuse with neglecting our blog in the future.  As always, I am here to answer any additional questions you may have; I’m watching the facebook and twitter feeds for all of your website questions.

Read more
iStock_000017445299Medium_0
The three most important questions

The three most important questions to ask yourself when hiring website designers and developers:

Most of the times when we are asked about building a website, the first three questions we receive are: When can it be done?  Do I need to do anything?  How much will it cost?

These questions pop out within the first five minutes, and are unfortunately anything but easy to determine.  Whether we like to admit it or not, a project like this does not usually have quick answers to number 1 or number 3.  The short answers are usually “when do you need it by” and another answer telling you “typically between ‘x’ and ‘y’, depending on how large of a project it is”.  This brings me to the three important questions you must know the answer to in order to make any meeting with a developer/designer as beneficial as possible.

What kind of website do I want?

The most important thing to ask yourself when looking to build a website is what kind of website do you want?  By kind of website, I am referring more towards what you hope to get out of the website than what type of business or setup it may be.  Are you looking for:

  1. A quick method to get your presence online
  2. An extension of your branding with little to no added features
  3. A platform that you can use to direct your online strategy for years to come

The average designers and developers are automatically assuming it will be part way between the second and third option, or solely the third option.  When you ask any of your other questions about price and time, the answers you receive will be based on this assumption.

How much do I want to spend?

The second most important thing to ask yourself is “how much am I willing to spend to get what I want?”  This is a difficult question to ask, because there is usually someone out there who knows “a guy” who can do it for a fraction of a cost.

 

you can get an idea of the quality of work they do from looking at their website

 

This dynamic influences what the end cost is expected to be when going elsewhere.  I am here to tell you that much like anything else in life, not all websites are created equal; nine times out of ten you really do get when you pay for.

It’s up to you to define your budget, but if you go into it with a budget clear from the get-go, you can even meet with developers/designers that look to be within your target price range; the easy thing about hiring a designer/developer is that you can get an idea of the quality of work they do from looking at their website (and portfolio).  Once you end up meeting with them, don’t be afraid to mention what you’re looking to spend; it will lead to a more informed proposal from them and let you know how far your money will go from company to company.

When does it need to be done? (We are flexible)

Most website designers and developers are flexible.  We have a sometimes frightening ability to create time where there seems to be no time.

 

The next question is when this really needs to be done by.  I know everybody would like it “as soon as possible”, but specifically find out when you want the site to launch.  Is there a grand opening, anniversary, or launch party planned?  Let the designer/developer know what the specific deadline is, as this will both prevent a project from dragging, but it will also allow for them to keep you on track for when they need content.

Most website designers and developers are flexible.  We have a sometimes frightening ability to create time where there seems to be no time.  If a project really needs to be done in three weeks, we can recite the phrase “we shall double our efforts” and a forty hour work week turns into a sixty or eighty hour work week.  Because we can seemingly hit most deadlines if they are viewed important enough though, it does not mean that it is any less work to finish a project because we found a way to shave 2 weeks off the project timeline.  If anything, it was more work.

What does a website mean to you? (Bonus Question)

In a time where your website will ultimately be seen by more potential customers and clients than any other form of marketing, it can easily be said that it is the most important aspect of your brand behind the logo itself.  Former first-tier tools such as business cards, flyers, decals, stickers, swag, and commercials are now used as a method to direct people to your website; your website tells someone everything they need to know about you.

And you control what they see when they get there.  As website designers/developers, we try to make it memorable.

Read more

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *